AGMATINE

Discussion in 'Supplements' started by khaled hamlaoui, Jun 28, 2016.

  1. khaled hamlaoui

    khaled hamlaoui New Member

    Agmatine, also known as (4-aminobutyl)guanidine is a derivative of the amino acid l-arginine.
    In the body, Agmatine is widely and unevenly distributed. It has been identified in the stomach, aorta, small intestine, large intestine, spleen, lung, vas deferens (of the male genital tract), adrenal gland, kidney, heart, liver, skeletal muscle, the testes, and brain. The concentration of agmatine varies in different parts of these organs. The highest concentrations of which were the stomach, aorta, and small intestine.
    Research into agmatine reveals a potential to improve the symptoms related to neuropathic pain, and the ability to assist with the treatment of drug addiction. Agmatine also helps to govern nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, as well as working to properly regulate cellular energy by overseeing polyamine metabolic function. This makes agmatine sulfate a popular pump-inducing supplement choice.

    In the muscle building and sports performance realm, agmatine works to provide the following potential benefits:

    • Improved muscle pumps via the inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS).
    • Better intra-workout energy.
    • In the role of a nootropic, aiding with mental clarity (focus), stress management and mental health.
    • Helps to promote healthy insulin sensitivity, promoting leanness and muscle building.
    • Increases appetite even when full, making it easier for underweight individuals to gain weight and muscle.
    Agmatine Side Effects:
      • Minor potential for gastrointestinal discomfort.
      • Limited testing at high dosages.
      • Lowering of blood pressure.

    References:
    - Roberts JC, et al. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic studies of agmatine after spinal administration in the mouse. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. (2005)
    -Fairbanks CA, et al. Agmatine reverses pain induced by inflammation, neuropathy, and spinal cord injury. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. (2000)

    -Abe K, Abe Y, and Saito H. Agmatine suppresses nitric oxide production in microglia. Brain Res. 872: 141-148, 2000.
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2016
    GEORGE TOULIATOS likes this.
  2. SwolenONE

    SwolenONE Active Member Staff Member

    Definitely a quality supplement, great for increasing your pumps while training.
     
    khaled hamlaoui likes this.
  3. GEORGE TOULIATOS

    GEORGE TOULIATOS Active Member

    Actualy it was banned from Greek market,last week!
     
    khaled hamlaoui likes this.
  4. khaled hamlaoui

    khaled hamlaoui New Member

    what was the reason for banning agmatine
     

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